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A new standard of care for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea in dogs

Video

Boarded oncologist Sue Ettinger talks crofelemer delayed-release tablets (Canalevia-CA1)

This content is sponsored by Jaguar Health.

In this segment of dvm360 Live!™, Sue Ettinger, DVM, DACVIM (oncology), introduces crofelemer delayed-release tablets (Canalevia-CA1) and explains how it works to control chemotherapy-induced canine diarrhea.

The following is a partial transcript. See the full video for more:

Sue Ettinger, DVM, DACVIM (oncology): [Canalevia-CA1] is locally acting, and it's an antisecretory drug. It works on the chloride channels to restore water balance, so they don't have that watery diarrhea.

Adam Christman, DVM, MBA: Can general practitioners prescribe this?

Sue Ettinger, DVM, DACVIM (oncology): Yes, just remember it's FDA-approved only for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea.

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