Grape and Raisin Poisoning in Dogs

October 27, 2016
American Veterinarian Editorial Staff

Tina Wismer, DVM, DABVT, DABT, MS, medical director at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, outlines the necessary steps in handling cases of canine grape/raisin poisoning.

Tina Wismer, DVM, DABVT, DABT, MS, medical director at the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, outlines the necessary steps in handling cases of canine grape/raisin poisoning.

Interview Transcript (slightly modified for readability)

Dogs with [history of ingesting] grapes and raisins.This can be potentially a frustrating toxicant because we don’t know what the actual poison is in the grapes and raisins. Is it a compound? Is it a mycotoxin? We don’t know. Why do only some dogs become affected and others don't? Perhaps it’s something genetic?

Unfortunately, since we don’t kidney transplants in dogs on a regular basis in dogs we need to treat these guys very aggressively. We need decontaminate with emesis, and activated charcoal. Put those dogs on intravenous fluids for about two days and watch their kidney enzymes to make sure they don’t develop any clinical signs.