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Doors of opportunity

Article

OK, so let's say you disagreed with Mark Opperman last month. You've done fine without written employment contracts, and you never intend to put one in place. Or maybe you tried to move to twice-yearly exams in November, and every client refused your recommendation ...

OK, so let's say you disagreed with Mark Opperman last month. You've done fine without written employment contracts, and you never intend to put one in place. Or maybe you tried to move to twice-yearly exams in November, and every client refused your recommendation. Or maybe you read Bob Levoy's latest book recommendation and hated it.

Marnette Falley

You know what? That's OK. We won't even kick you out of the "Friends of Vet Ec" club. Well, not today at least.

Our team here tries to learn as much as possible about best practices. We read about management strategies. We go to sessions. We talk with experts. We ask what challenges are keeping you up at night. We go looking for solutions. We try to work with the smartest, savviest people we can and share their advice. But no one is right all the time. No advice is going to work in absolutely every situation, no matter how good it is. Right? Isn't that your experience? And no one knows your business as well as you do.

I can't promise that the strategies that worked to generate a 26 percent increase in gross revenue for Dr. Curie's practice this year will deliver precisely the same results for you. But then again, maybe they will.

Sometimes I get the feeling that people think we're trying to dictate management. Nothing could be further from the truth. We hope that you'll look at all the good business advice we offer. But then we expect you to decide which ideas to pursue and how to apply them.

Here's a light example. I read lots of magazines, and I like articles about decorating and cooking. But I do not repaint when the experts say purple is the best color for fall, and then again when the experts say yellow is wonderful for spring. And I'm sure you don't either. I do tear out my very favorite kitchen layout from the magazine for the day when I yank out those cabinets that simply have to go. And I do reorganize the cupboard under the sink when they hand me the perfect plan.

My point here: Don't try to do it all. But do file away the idea you think you'll need later, so you have a strategy in your hip pocket when you decide to take action. And do tackle anything that inspires you in the moment. Even if it doesn't turn out exactly the way you expect, you'll probably learn from the experience. And at least you'll have started down the road.

I read once that starting is the most important step, even if you start wrong. The author put it this way: It's like walking down a really long hallway. You can't see the doors on either side until you start down the hall.

That's what we hope to give you. The curiosity to start down the hall. And a glimpse, maybe, of the next set of doors. It's up to you to decide, then, which ones to open.

Marnette Denell Falley, Editor

ve@advanstar.com

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