Current Trends for Managing Osteoarthritis in Animals

March 19, 2018

Historically, veterinarians have done a pretty poor job of managing osteoarthritis, says David Dycus, DVM, MS, CCRP, DACVS, orthopedic staff surgeon at Veterinary Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Group in Annapolis, Maryland.

Historically, veterinarians have done a pretty poor job of managing osteoarthritis, says David Dycus, DVM, MS, CCRP, DACVS, orthopedic staff surgeon at Veterinary Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Group in Annapolis, Maryland.

Osteoarthritis, particularly in dogs, is usually secondary to another problem, Dr. Dycus adds. In those instances, it is important to get the primary problem under control to slow down and minimize the progression of osteoarthritis. When there is an exasperation of clinical signs associated with osteoarthritis, Dr. Dycus says pharmaceuticals, physical rehabilitation, or intra-articular injections might be used.