The waiting game: designing veterinary hospital lobbies right

January 17, 2019
Vicki Pollard, CVT, AIA

Vicki Pollard is a certified veterinary technician and veterinary architect at Animal Arts in Boulder, Colorado. She also speaks at the Veterinary Economics Hospital Design Conference.

We've moved beyond rows of straight chairs in a face off.

If you picture a waiting area as a couple ranks of barely comfortable chairs or benches positioned opposite each other, it's time to get up to speed. HospitalDesign360 conference speaker Vicki Pollard, CVT, AIA, has some pointers for getting your lobby right.

First is the issue of space-also known as the issue of safety.

"There are plenty of pets out there that are going to come in your lobby who don't like other dogs, other cats," Pollard says.

She says the idea here is just to give everyone enough room to pass by one another safely. This will avoid accidents and keep the dander down.

Reception resources

The evolving veterinary reception area.

Tiny makeover: Declutter your veterinary hospital's reception area.

5 components of a great veterinary reception area.

Another issue is configuration of the seating. Having more varied options available to clients-and their pets-is a good practice.

"One person may feel more comfortable in a little closed off nook, while another person may feel more comfortable maybe at a higher bar type seating scenario," Pollard says.

One other item for the claustrophobes out there: Being able see, or at least sense the outside world is an added bonus, she says. This can be accomplished with windows and natural light.

Watch the video for more.

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