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Tell your story

Article

Most of us aren't very comfortable talking about ourselves. It's a hard skill to master, and too often it feels like you're bragging. But if you're not talking about what you do well, how will others know? If you're waiting for them to catch you in the act, you may have a long wait.

Tell your story

Most of us aren't very comfortable talking about ourselves. It's a hard skill to master, and too often it feels like you're bragging. But if you're not talking about what you do well, how will others know? If you're waiting for them to catch you in the act, you may have a long wait. Your managers just don't have the time to tune in to all your successes. That's why it's up to you to tell them.

So how do you get to the core of what you do well? Career counselors will tell you, when you're trying to sell your skills to others, it's all about telling your boss—or potential employer—how you can help him or her. Sure, you want to tell why you're great, but it needs to match up nicely with the problem your boss is trying to solve.

Now you may be thinking, "I already have a job, do I really need to keep selling myself?" The answer is, "Absolutely." What do you want your boss to remember at review time? What if your dream job opens up? Wouldn't it be nice if your boss thought of you first?

It's simple, really. Just keep a running list of your accomplishments at work—all the way-to-gos from clients and team members and the extra tasks you took on. Then, when you're gunning for that promotion—or gearing up for your annual review—you've got a great list of examples that show just how valuable you really are to your practice and your clients.

This strategy also works great when you're job hunting. So whether your dream job is a promotion in your practice or you're imagining launching a fabulous career at a different hospital, do your research. What's the boss looking for? What skills do you realistically possess that fulfill this need? Now here's the tricky part—do it without using the word "I." Remember, you're trying to fulfill someone else's needs, not your own.

So what does that sound like? "I'm a dedicated team player eager to join your team of compassionate caregivers and ready to offer my planning skills and attention to detail to help meet your goals of improving client service and offering the best care to every patient." There you go. You did it! Now get out there and tell them why you're so great.

Portia Stewart, Editor

firstline@advanstar.com

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