Study to determine if pesticides disrupt endocrine systems

Article

Washington -- The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is ordering the manufacturers of 67 pesticide chemicals to test whether their chemicals disrupt the endocrine systems in animals and humans.

Washington

-- The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is ordering the manufacturers of 67 pesticide chemicals to test whether their chemicals disrupt the endocrine systems in animals and humans.

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that interact with and possibly disrupt the hormones produced or secreted by the animal or human endocrine system, which regulates growth, metabolism and reproduction.

"Endocrine disruptors can cause lifelong health problems -- especially for children," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. "Gathering this information will help us work with communities and industry to protect Americans from harmful exposure."

The EPA will issue test orders to the manufacturers this summer to determine whether their chemicals disrupt estrogen, androgen and thyroid.

The list of chemicals the EPA has ordered tested was developed on the basis of exposure potential and should not be construed as a list of known or likely endocrine disruptors, the agency cautions.

The listed pesticide chemicals were selected because there is high potential for exposure through food and water, human residential activity or agricultural pesticide application.

Testing, conducted through the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP), eventually will be expanded to cover all pesticide chemicals.

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