Assessing Patients for Multi-trauma Injuries

October 19, 2016
American Veterinarian Editorial Staff

Elke Rudloff, DVM, DACVECC, clinical specialist and residency trauma supervisor at Lakeshore Veterinary Specialists, discusses how to clinically assess possible multi-trauma cases.

Elke Rudloff, DVM, DACVECC, clinical specialist and residency trauma supervisor at Lakeshore Veterinary Specialists, discusses how to clinically assess possible multi-trauma cases.

Interview Transcript (slightly modified for readability)

"The best approach that I use to avoid missing problems in a multi-trauma case is to first evaluate the primary survey and focus on the body systems with which they could expire very quickly from and that would be the respiratory system, the cardiovascular system, and the neurological system, and at the same time, addressing any pain that they have.

Following stabilization of any abnormalities of the primary systems review, then we can focus on a more comprehensive physical exam and abnormalities not associated with the primary survey such as fractures or wounds.”