Episode 22: What it takes to be an emergency care veterinary technician

October 15, 2020
dvm360 Staff

On this episode of The Vet Blast Podcast, Dr. Christman, speaks with Marlaina Hrosch, LVT, RVT, who explains the ins and outs of the emergency technician role.

With high volumes of anxiety, depression, compassion fatigue, and burnout, it’s no question that veterinary technicians jump through hoops daily to ensure their clinic’s success. Taking the brunt of the entire practice protocol from beginning to end, they work tirelessly around the clock to save their patients every day.

For emergency technician Marlaina Hrosch, LVT, RVT, a training manager at Veterinary Emergency Group in White Plains, NY, it’s a tough job but a labor of love.

“I love not knowing what’s going to walk in the door. I love that rush that you get when that critical patient comes in,” she tells Dr. Christman in the latest episode of The Vet Blast Podcast.

“You see a lot of not so happy things— but when those cases come in that are supercritical— bite wounds— something along those lines and you get to take care of them and see them go home a couple of days later—there’s nothing better than that to me,” she says.

Hrosch also offers some insight into what it means to be a veterinary technician. In the emergency setting, she says technicians are generally responsible for triaging new cases, helping to stabilize critical cases, and taking care of the in-patients. Hrosch is also responsible for training all the technicians within her company throughout the US.

Another key technician role: client communication, especially in emergency clinics, says Hrosch, adding that building repour and trust with clients makes it easier to ask those tough questions.

“You can learn a lot from [your] veterinary technicians,” says Hrosch, “So, don’t overlook the value in veterinary technicians. There are different levels of knowledge…. but for the most part, we can be incredibly helpful.”

Listen below to learn more about this veterinary technician’s journey through emergent care, along with her advice for new graduates.