What do disappearing insects, pollution, the black plague and veterinary practice have in common?

November 3, 2017
Jennifer Gaumnitz, Senior Content Specialist
Jennifer Gaumnitz, Senior Content Specialist

Jennifer Gaumnitz is a senior content specialist with dvm360.com. She has worked for the organization in its various incarnations for more than 34 years (thus, the "senior"), for several years serving as managing editor of Veterinary Medicine magazine. She has a bachelors degree in Journalism and Mass Communication with an emphasis in Science Writing and a minor in Zoology from Iowa State University.

The answer: One Health. Such a significant movementand youre a vital part!

One Health on dvm360.com

dvm360 covers the One Health movement year-round. Put on your One Health goggles and watch for those connections and the elements that fall under the One Health umbrella.

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Senator introduces legislation to fight diseases such as Zika and Ebola

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Veterinarians are the other family doctor

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Book draws parallels between veterinary, human medicine

Human cardiologist's research dovetails with goals of One Health.

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Drug for heart disease shows promise for cats (and humans)

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Initiative spans industries, aims to improve health, preparedness

Human and veterinary leaders push united efforts to make a global impact

A peek at vet med of tomorrow

In which we explore strange new zoonoses, seek out better diagnostics and new treatments, and engineer cats for world peace. (Really.)

Zoonosis

This page is your portal to all things zoonotic.

Happy One Health Day! Every year on November 3, International One Health Day is observed around the world. So on this day, we at dvm360 want to take a moment to remind you of how important you and your team are to the interdisciplinary collaboration that is at the core of the One Health movement.

Veterinarians and their teams are involved in many of the areas that fall under the One Health umbrella. You provide veterinary care for cats, dogs, horses and exotic pets to prevent zoonoses from spreading to their human families and to preserve the human-animal bond for as many years as possible. You know a lot about vector-borne and parasitic infections and how to prevent them, perhaps more than your counterparts in human medicine. You strive to ensure food safety and are at the forefront of combating antimicrobial resistance. You work on technology and procedures that one day may translate to human medicine, or the converse; you are working to adapt human medical advances to the veterinary field.

And you see One Health connections everywhere you look. When you see science bulletins such as “Flying Insects Are Disappearing at Huge Rates, And We Should All Be Worried,” you're knowledgeable enough to understand the implications-and you see the connections. Or when you see news articles such as “Pollution linked to 9 million deaths worldwide each year,” you're concerned about pollution's effects on animals, as well as humanity-and you see the connections. Or when you read about current events like the deadly black plague outbreak in Madagascar, you know Yersinia is usually transmitted through flea bites and rodents are involved-and you see the connections.

Should you ever doubt the importance of your role in One Health, please take just 13 minutes to watch this inspiring TEDx Talk, “The One Health Movement; Animals, Environment, and Us,” by Ralph Richardson, DVM, ACVIM (Internal Medicine and Oncology), former dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University.

We also suggest you share with clients that your veterinary team is an integral part of the larger One Health movement. You might share one of these short engaging videos with your clients:

One World, One Health,” a fun 2.5-minute animated short by HealthforAnimals

One Health: From Concept to Action,” 2.5 minutes with photos and catchy music, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

We at dvm360 think your daily work is vital to the One Health movement, and on this particular day we want that realization to really and truly sink in.

P.S. Maybe you can celebrate One Health Day by going to see the new Jane movie, chronicling the career of Jane Goodall. Connections everywhere, I tell you!