Shelter Animal Intake Decreases with High Spay/Neuter Rates

March 11, 2017

Emily McCobb, DVM, MS, DACVAA, director of shelter medicine in the clinical sciences department at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, explains how in certain parts of the country there has actually been a decrease in animal shelter intake.

Emily McCobb, DVM, MS, DACVAA, director of shelter medicine in the clinical sciences department at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, explains how in certain parts of the country there has actually been a decrease in animal shelter intake.

She says in New England specifically, shelter intake is plummeting because spay/neuter rates of owned animals are somewhere around 90%. This has allowed shelters to bring animals from other parts of the country to find forever homes in the region because there are not enough local dogs to meet the demand.