AVMA accreditation council extends Tuskegees probation period

May 11, 2016

Veterinary school has one outstanding major deficiency to correct before being awarded full accreditation. tu

The curriculum at Tuskegee University's veterinary school needs improvement, according to the the American Veterinary Medical Association's Council on Education (AVMA COE).

 

The COE decided to extend the school's probationary accreditation status after a spring 2016 site visit, according to the council's Spring 2016 Notice of Accreditation Actions report. The report states that Tuskegee has a major deficiency in standard nine-curriculum. The probationary period will be extended for one more year.

 

Probationary accreditation is given to a college that has one or more major deficiencies that have more than minimal impact on student learning or safety. These deficiencies must be corrected in two years, and the colleges must submit reports to the council every six months.

 

The school was initially put on probationary accreditation after a fall 2013 site visit, for a period not to exceed two years. School officials addressed the probation in a statement on its website:

 

“After the site visit in October of 2013, the COE placed Tuskegee University School of Veterinary Medicine (TUSVM) on probationary status.The next focused site visit is scheduled for January 2016.

 

The TUSVM is taking immediate steps to develop a plan to address the reported deficiencies and move toward full accreditation. It is important to understand that the current status of accreditation has no impact on the quality of the educational programs for our students.”

This is not the first time that Tuskegee has been placed on downgraded accreditation. In 2008 the college of veterinary medicine was moved from full to limited accreditation, which meant it did not meet standards in at least two of 11 areas. Those deficiencies were addressed, and the college was granted full accreditation again in 2009.