ACVIM Forum posts solid attendance numbers

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MINNEAPOLIS-THE 22nd American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) Forum had a turnout of 2,503 veterinarians and veterinary students this year, and surpassed its previous record of technician attendees.

MINNEAPOLIS—THE 22nd American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) Forum had a turnout of 2,503 veterinarians and veterinary students this year, and surpassed its previous record of technician attendees.

The forum took place June 9-10 at the Minneapolis Convention Center with specialists ranging from cardiologists and oncologists to neurologists in attendance.

More than 275 sessions were devoted to small animal health care covering topics such as the canine genome, pet obesity in addition to a myriad of equine and food animal sessions.

ACVIM has experienced close to a 45 percent increase in membership over the past four years, making the meeting the nation's largest organization of board-certified veterinary specialists with nearly 1,450 members.

"I thought the forum was great," says Dr. Stephanie Lifton, of Antech Diagnostics. "I hadn't been there for a couple of years and I was really impressed with all of the speakers."

Lifton says, " I like to go for the abstracts, it gives cutting edge information on the forefront of veterinary medicine ."I went to seminars on diabetes and Cushing's Disease this year and in the small animal sessions, there are special focuses like - proteinuria, Lifton adds.

"The forum is wonderful," says Dr. Maryland Stiff, a private practitioner from Charlotte, N.C. "It combines good science, good speakers and covers everything within internal medicine."

Stiff has been attending the forums since 1983 when she became a member of ACVIM. "I have never missed a meeting," Stiff says.

"The forum has gone from three sessions going on at the same time to about 15 sessions at the same time," Stiff says. "So it has grown significantly over the years and keeps getting better."

Other years, the focus was on topics like thyroid disease in dogs, Lifton says. "Things veterinarians have to deal with every day."

"You also get to catch up with people you only get to see maybe once a year," she adds.

Dr. Joe Taboada, ACVIM president adds, "Membership in our organization is a direct result of American pet owners becoming more aware of specialty care options available and demanding the same level of treatment for their pets as they would for other members of their families."

Next year's ACVIM Forum, already on the planning table, is slated for June 1-5 in Baltimore.

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