Practice tip: Therapeutic diet? Its in the cart

May 24, 2019
Gabrielle Roman, Content Marketing Manager
Gabrielle Roman, Content Marketing Manager

Gabrielle Roman is the Content Marketing Manager for the dvm360 team. She helps brainstorm, produce and promote all the excellent content you can find on dvm360.com and the print publications dvm360 magazine, Firstline and Vetted. In 2018, she was named a Folio: Rising Star Award Honoree.

If the veterinarian is recommending a therapeutic diet for a patient, put it in the online cart and set up reminders to increase client compliance.

Give your clients a little nudge toward compliance. (Comugnero Silvana/stock.adobe.com)

A client just found out her dog is showing potential signs of hip dysplasia. The veterinarian recommends a joint supplement, fish oil and a therapeutic diet.

“Got it,” says the client and walks out the veterinary hospital with the list in her hand and good intentions in her heart. But we all know that the road to noncompliance is paved with good intentions. The list gets lost, buried at the bottom of a bag or just forgotten in the shuffle.

What can you do to help clients who are still in a post-diagnosis haze? You can take the first step for them-drop the diet recommended by the veterinarian into their cart in your online store. Make sure you have the right email address on file for the veterinary client, then set up reminders that the food is sitting in the cart.

The client will see that the food is there the next time she checks her email. If she gets distracted or tells herself she'll think about it later, another reminder shows up a few days later. You can even offer a “final notice” that the cart is about to expire to help the client take action.

This method works with any product the veterinary team recommends and your online store carries. If clients truly don't want to purchase the item, they won't. But if they simply forget because, well, life happens, you're offering them a convenient and gentle nudge to action. Compliant client, healthy dog, happy veterinary practice. It's a win-win-win.