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The color of health

Article

A gene that determines a dog's coat color may help scientists learn why people are thin or fat, or cope differently with stress.

A gene that determines a dog's coat color may help scientists learn why people are thin or fat, or cope differently with stress. Researchers at Stanford University say a gene that produces yellow and black fur in dogs also makes the beta defensin protein. Why is that important? Well, dogs and people have similar beta defensin-producing genes, and this protein determines canine stress adaptation and weight regulation. If human beta defensin proteins work similarly, new drugs and treatments for weight and stress management could result.

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