Video: Don't stress your dog!

Video: Don't stress your dog!

Things we do every day can be stress triggers for our beloved pooches. Here's how pet owners can help break the cycle of stress for their best friends.
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Jul 06, 2015
By dvm360.com staff

Oftentimes pet owners will have the best of intentions—but are unknowingly driving their dogs' stress levels through the roof. Everyday actions like pointing a finger, making eye contact or pulling on a leash may be contributing to a super-stressed pooch. Help stop the cycle of stress by offering clients the tips from this video, or better yet, post it on your practice website or social media channels (directions appear below) so clients can get the details right away.

Here's to lower stress levels and happy dogs!

Follow these instructions to embed a dvm360 YouTube video onto your veterinary practice's website

  1. Press play on the video player, above. Then click the YouTube icon to view the video on YouTube.com. (Visit dvm360's client education video playlist on YouTube here.)
  2. Beneath the bottom right corner of the video player, click the Share button, and share via social media. To share on your practice website, select Embed. Customization options will appear below.
  3. Click a standard video-player size or type in custom dimensions to fit your Web page.
  4. Click inside the embed code box to select the text. Next, copy the text.
  5. Open your Web page file, identify where you want the video to appear, and paste the embed text in your HTML code.
  6. Save and upload your revised page to your website.

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