Hospital design | dvm360

Hospital design

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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Sep 01, 2002
Twenty-four percent of Well-Managed Practices offer separate canine and feline seating areas. How separate do the areas need to be to make the distinction effective, and how could you add this feature to a facility economically?
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Sep 01, 2002
Drs. Lamar and Amber Crossland knew they wanted Sunset Canyon Veterinary Clinic in central Texas to appeal to long-time ranchers as well as to the Austin urbanites who’d fled the city for greener pastures in Dripping Springs, Texas. And the mixed animal practice also needed to accommodate a gamut of patients, from livestock to polo horses to pampered pooches. One last requirement: seamless movement between the large animal and small animal sides of the practice, because all staff members worked in both areas.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Aug 01, 2002
By dvm360.com staff
Your choice to work in the beauty of the countryside or on the teeming street corner in view of all passersby may influence your state of mind—but it also affects your pay. The Brakke Management and Behavior Study, released in 1999, shows that practitioners who choose to live in rural settings generally earn less than their urban counterparts. For example, practice owners who work in communities of 2,500 people or fewer earn 21 percent less than owners who live in larger communities.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jul 01, 2002
When Dr. Randy Spencer stepped outside his hospital doors 13 years ago and glanced around the growing suburb of Phoenix that surrounded First Regional Animal Hospital, he didn’t like what he saw. Ten veterinary hospitals were situated within a 3-mile radius of the practice. "That kind of competition dampens productivity," says the 1987 Colorado State graduate.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Jun 01, 2002
Dr. Troy Bearden likens building a new hospital to walking a tightrope without a net. "You take a chance and hope you don’t fall," he says. For him and his partner, Dr. Catherine Mabe, the risk paid off. Their 5,300-square-foot Shallowford Animal Hospital in Chattanooga, Tenn., more than doubles the size of their former facility and won a Merit Award in the 2002 Veterinary Economics Hospital Design Competition. Two years after opening, the doctors still see new-client numbers increase 30 percent a month.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: May 01, 2002
General practitioners launching their own practices often start small, hoping to afford a larger space eventually. Not so with specialty/emergency practices, say Drs. Gary Block and Justine Johnson, husband-and-wife owners of Ocean State Veterinary Specialists in East Greenwich, R.I.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Apr 01, 2002
Drs. Buddy Smith and Benet Sandell started their building project reluctantly. Although they had contemplated renovating or rebuilding before relocating, a big push from a road project forced Hill Country Veterinary Hospital to build on a new site on the outskirts of Austin, Texas, 1/2-mile from their previous site. Today they practice in a 3,100-square-foot, award-winning facility.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2002
“Practice owners want to put their best foot forward, which makes the hospital foyer, reception area, and waiting area the most popular for remodel projects,” says Dan Chapel, AIA, NCARB, owner of Chapel and Associates Architecture in Little Rock, Ark., and a Veterinary Economics Editorial Advisory Board member. “Luckily, those areas are the easiest projects to tackle.”
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Mar 01, 2002
Drs. Tia Greenberg and Heidi Tschauner admit that patience is not one of their virtues. With a bit less than 10 years of practice experience, the doctors joined forces to start their own veterinary hospital in a brand-new, 8,815-square-foot facility. "Our experiences working in other practices taught us how important it was that our floor plan to promote an efficient flow of traffic and that we wanted a facility that felt warm and welcoming," Dr. Tschauner says. The product of this vision, Westminster Veterinary Group in Westminster, Calif., earned the 2002 Hospital of the Year award in the 37th annual Veterinary Economics Hospital Design Competition.
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HOSPITAL DESIGN SUPPLEMENT: Feb 01, 2002
When he moved his practice from the converted home it had occupied for 42 years, Dr. Rickey Broussard wanted to maintain the comfortable feel of the practice by building a facility that resembled Grandma’s house. And judges of Veterinary Economics’ 2001 Hospital Design competition agree that the homey front porch with brick accents gives the facility’s dramatic entrance and lofty ceilings the warm appeal Dr. Broussard strived for.